Theory based cognitive tests

Theory based tests are best for your business

From the end of the 20th Century and particularly in the early 21st Century a trend has developed so that cognitive ability tests are increasingly based on sound theoretical models. The benefits of basing ability tests on theoretical models are that they:

  • Incorporate the most up-to-date research about how the brain functions and how learning occurs
  • Allow for interpretation of results based on the theory
  • Guide translation of results into practical outcomes.

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Personality can influence performance on cognitive tests

Personality and Cognition

Personality and cognitive ability tests have long been used in job selection.  They have both been shown to be important predictors of job performance but are considered separate tests which measure different aspects of job suitability.

An interesting set of studies shows that they may have more in common than previously thought.  It has been shown that apsects of personality may actually influence performance on cognitive ability tests!

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Sleep and the workplace: the latest trends and research

The work culture

With Australians working longer hours than ever before and working the longest hours of all countries in the developed world, businesses are finding that they need to provide a greater number of more innovative ‘perks’ to reward their employees’ hard work, to keep their employees’ productive and to ensure they attract and retain the best workers in a competitive marketplace.

Some common examples of perks used by leading organisations, according to Human Capital Magazine’s Perky Perks article include additional maternity/paternity or ‘personal health’ leave, referral bonuses and training.

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SAY NO TO BULLYING

A new national campaign backed by big business, sportspeople, charities, ministers and celebrities has been unveiled in an effort to eliminate bullying in the workplace and other settings, according to Human Capital Magazine.

Involved are such organisations as Foxtel, Channel 9, and Living Social; such high profile individuals as cricketer Brad Haddin, sports commentator Phil Gould, rugby league player Sandor Earl, and former rugby league player and television personality Mario Fenech.

The campaign, which kicked off on 27 September, was created by anti-bullying advocate Christian Marchegiani of Underdogs, an Australian organisation created to help people realise their full potential through courage, self-discovery and team-work.

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Selecting Job Applicants in the Age of Social Media

An article in the ‘mycareer’ section of 4 October’s Sydney Morning Herald revealed that increasingly employers are using social media sites such as Twitter to help select job applicants.  Alan Geere, from Essex Chronicle Media Group and Northcliffe Media South East in the UK this week asked would-be reporters to apply for jobs by tweeting 140 words about themselves.

Twitter has also been used by such well known organisations as McDonalds and Sony.

Mr Geere advised in his blog that he preferred this method of seeking employees as he is “fed up with wading through turgid ‘letters of application’ and monstrous CVs”.

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THE UNSKILLED NEED NOT APPLY

Finding amply qualified candidates to fulfill a specific job description and skill set is not always the simple task. When you ask whether or not a candidate is proficient in a particular skill, you will most likely receive the answer you are looking for: yes. However, surveys have implicated that 1/3 of job candidates tell little white lies during the recruitment process. How do you know who has the best skills without testing them?

Decrease the Chances of “Bad Hires”
Skills testing plays a major role in hiring the perfect people for jobs which require proficiency in specific domains. It provides an objective, fair, and efficient method of comparison. A candidate can say that they are proficient in Microsoft Word, for instance, but once you have hired them, you may find out that they are not as skilled as they stated in the interview. By then, you have already hired them and, like anyone that does the hiring and firing in a company knows, it is extremely difficult to get rid of a bad hire.

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Using Integrity Testing in Order to Deter Employee Theft and Absenteeism

When employers consider or discuss employee theft, their thoughts are usually focused on protecting assets such as the business bank account and petty cash. The truth is, most of the employee theft that occurs at work comes in the form of taking office supplies and other merchandise that belongs to the company, as well as incorrectly reporting time sheets that reflect the hours that were worked, sick leave, absenteeism and vacation time.  These untrustworthy, and quite often overlooked, behaviours unnecessarily cost employers billions of dollars every year.

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Implementing Skills Testing Into the Interview Process

It is beneficial for all employers to implement skills testing during the interview process. This allows employers to rate the candidates and decide whether or not they possess the ability to perform the job duties that they are interviewing for. Job candidates are hungrier than ever to obtain employment, and it is important that companies hire carefully in order to protect themselves. This is where job interview skills assessments come into play; they save the company the time and frustration of hiring the wrong person.

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BIG FIVE AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

Evidence for the Relationship between the Big 5 and Academic Achievement

Many different personality traits have been linked to academic performance. Since the Five Factor Model, or “Big 5”, has enjoyed prominence in the personality literature (Digman, 1990), as well as being recognised by the economics literature (Borghans et al., 2008), we believe it is valuable to organise the findings of the research regarding personality and performance around the Big 5 framework. Here we review these findings, one factor at a time.

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The Big 5 Facets

Personality Assessment and the Big 5
Personality assessment has a long history in psychology. Hundreds, maybe thousands of personality traits or constructs have been suggested over the years. But in the last 20 years the field has essentially reached a consensus – there is a much smaller number of independent dimensions underlying the myriad of constructs suggested (Digman, 1990; Goldberg, 1993; John, 1990).

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RightPeople’s Time Management Research

Published in the Sydney Morning Herald.

Out of Time?

Researchers at the University of Sydney’s Department of Psychology have found that being a good time manager is closely related to how conscientious a person is, and that this may be a personality trait rather than a skill one can acquire. Good time managers are also likely to be early birds, and slightly more prone to worrying.

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Personality Assessment – The Five Factor Model

This paper examines and summarises the big five-factor model, a tool used for studying personality.

One of the long-held goals of psychology has been to establish a model that can conveniently describe human personality, with the intent to use this model in improving the general understanding of personality.

Currently, a handful of models have risen to prominence, and have thus far stood the test of time.

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RightPeople in the News – Sydney Morning Herald Article

It’s official: the early bird doesn’t necessarily catch the worm.

A new and accurate measure of whether a person is a so-called ‘early bird’ or’ night owl’ could be useful in selecting people for jobs involving shift work, according to Dr Richard Roberts from RightPeople.

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You Can’t Beat Psychometric Testing

As published in Computer Weekly

More than 70% of top companies now use psychometric tests – and there is no way to trick them in order to get a job says job agency body the Recruitment and Employment Confederation. They also warn that trying to guess the “right” answer to test questions is not only impossible but will probably reveal someone as a liar.

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What We Know about Emotional Intelligence

Emotional Intelligence

How It Affects Learning, Work, Relationships, and Our Mental Health
Richard D. Roberts

Emotional intelligence (or EI) — the ability to perceive, regulate, and communicate emotions, and to understand emotions in ourselves and others — has been the subject of best-selling books, magazine cover stories, and countless media mentions.

It has been touted as a solution for problems ranging from relationship issues to the inadequacies of local schools. But the media hype has far outpaced the scientific research on emotional intelligence. In ‘What We Know about Emotional Intelligence’, three experts who are actively involved in research into EI offer a state-of-the-art account of EI in theory and practice. They tell us what we know about EI based, not on anecdotes or wishful thinking, but on scientific evidence.

EI promises a new means for achieving success and personal happiness. Coaches and consultants offer EI training and administer EQ tests — despite the lack of any agreement on how to measure EI, the usefulness of testing for EI, and even how to define EI. ‘What We Know about Emotional Intelligence’ looks at current knowledge about EI with the goal of translating it into practical recommendations in work, school, social, and psychological contexts. The authors discuss what is (and what isn’t) EI, why the concept has such appeal today, how EI develops, and the usefulness of EI in the real world — in school curricula, the workplace, and treating psychological dysfunction.

 

Human Resources in the Modern Workplace

Modern-Workplace

“When hiring for a position, taking into account the various interview techniques at the disposal of the average Director, Executive, HR Manager or Business Owner, we can expect that there is about a 70%  chance that the person employed will be an average or good employee. “

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