Ambiverts, Extraverts, and Sales Job Performance

 

In this article we look at Ambiverts, Extraverts, and Sales Job Performance and announce the new Accounts Payable and Receivable Test

 

Sales Aptitude Personality Research

Article Highlights

Extraversion vs Introversion is one of the most studied personality dimensions. It was a long-held belief that extraversion would “take a person further” in business, particularly in sales. The most recent research supports a third personality type that is in a way, a combination of qualities of both introverts and extraverts. These personalities stand to make the biggest impact in leadership and in sales. The implications suggest that: 

• Organisations should screen candidates around the “right disposition” and sales aptitude rather than relying on training people to cope with the pressures and emotional aspects of being in sales.

• Organisations should consider re-thinking their personality style benchmarks for hiring sales staff and other roles where high levels of extraversion might seem like a key criteria.

• The research continues to show that regardless of “personality type,” the qualities of self confidence, commitment, etc. are always going to impact the balance of this scale.

 

Sales Aptitude Personality Model

Sales Aptitude Personality Model

 

» Read more

Employee Engagement Essential in Professional Services Firms

employee engagementThe importance of employee engagement has been discussed in previous posts. Recent research indicates that nowhere is employee engagement more important than in professional services firms. While these firms are necessarily primarily client focused, ultimately the success of professional services firms relies on the success of their employees’ work. And the most successful employees are engaged employees.

In fact, in professional services firms employee engagement is a strategic business initiative.

» Read more

English Second Language Training and Support

In Australia, on average 15 percent of all school students come from a non-English speaking background. In some states it is much higher: in New South Wales this figure is almost 25 percent English Second Language Students, as it is in the Northern Territory, and in Victoria it is 20 percent. According to Adriano Truscott, president of the Australian Council of TESOL (Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) Associations, Australia has an “outstanding tradition” in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL).

It is therefore vital that we have a great system for tracking the progress of our English Second Language Students (ESL) students, to cater for the needs of our high number of ESL students, as well as to safeguard our reputation as a leader in this field.

» Read more

Multitasking Ability and Intelligence

When dividing attention between two tasks (Multitasking), people need to find the most efficient ways of allocating their attentional or processing resources between the tasks. It is reasonable to presume that people with higher levels of intelligence will be better able to allocate their processing resources efficiently. This was investigated in a study by Ben-Shakhar and Sheffer. Read on to learn more about their findings and how RightPeople has used this information to help you make better choices during your recruitment process.

» Read more

Employee Retention Linked to Shared Values and Interests

employee retention is reliant on shared values & interests between the company & its employees Research by the American Psychological Association has found that workers are more likely to stay with employers when there is alignment between their values/interests and those of the organisation. They found that these factors were more important than remuneration and benefits.

The Workforce Retention Survey, conducted with American workers aged 18 years and above, examined a range of factors associated with employee retention. Even in the current economic climate, values and meaning were key drivers of employee satisfaction above financial considerations.

» Read more

Skills needed by multi-taskers

Brown (1998) investigated the concept of “time-sharing” proposed in earlier work on multi-tasking by Fogarty (1982) . Fogarty (1982) describes time-sharing as a factor that emerges when two tasks are undertaken simultaneously. This sharing of time between the tasks is the extra factor over and above those associated with performing each of the tasks in isolation.

In Brown’s paper two experiments were undertaken, one that involved completing a single task (manual tracking) and one dual tasks (manual tracking and a timing task). The following outcomes were found:

– An interference effect. Doing two tasks at the same time disrupted the speed of the timing task and made it more variable.

– A relationship between practice and interference. Practice on the tracking task under single-task conditions reduced the interference effect in timing. However, practice on the dual-task test was not successful at minimising the interference effect.

» Read more

Getting the most out of psychometric assessment

Our previous post Organisations are reaping the benefits of psychometric assessments summarised the outcomes of recent research by a leading organisational research firm which revealed the relationship between HR success and the use of psychometric assessment tools.

This post provides more information about the ways successful organisations use psychometric tools and incorporate them into their talent search and development programs. The 516 organisations involved in the research were placed into three groups based on criteria indicative of employee performance and satisfaction: best performers (best in class), average performers (industry average) and those lagging behind in their industry (laggards).

» Read more

Organisations are reaping the benefits of psychometric assessments

stand_out_assessmentOrganisations are continually looking for tools and techniques to help them make better hiring and promotion decisions, as well as for ways to set themselves apart in the search for talent. A 2011 survey by an organisational research company reveals the high prevalence and impressive benefits of psychometric assessments as part of a talent recruitment and development programs, particularly in an era when many organisations cannot afford to spend significant amounts of money hiring new staff.

The survey involved over 640 organisations, including more than 500 that used assessments as part of their hiring and talent development strategy. The researchers used several benchmarks of organisational HR success. These included: high rates of employees receiving outstanding performance reviews, sound succession plans and manager satisfaction rates. Read on to find out more about what these successful organisations did to set themselves apart…

» Read more

Job/person mismatch is a leading cause of underperformance

Underperforming employees can be very costly to organisations.  A 2009 article in the  Australian Financial Review  found that unproductive employees can cost Australian businesses up to approximately $33 billion a year!

A primary reason for underperformance is a poor fit between the employee’s skills and interests and the needs of the organisation. Another related reason is mangers not clearly specifying their expectations and the requirements of the role. Both of these can lead to an employee struggling to deliver on what is required. These issues are preventable however.

» Read more

Minimising the impact of disruptions in the workplace

Distractions such as telephone calls, emails, online notifications and colleagues stopping by for a chat, or even the time it takes to try to remove such distractions, are part and parcel of the modern workplace. We tend to take it for granted that long periods of uninterrupted work are few and far between.

Recent research has shown that this can have quite a damaging effect on productivity and work safety. A study conducted by Michigan State University found that interruptions as short as 3 seconds are enough to double the chance that an employee will make a mistake.

» Read more

Protecting your business against fraud and misconduct

As the business world becomes more diverse and expands across national boundaries, concerns about security and integrity in the workplace have never been higher. Stakeholder expectations for ethical business operations continue to rise, placing more responsibility on organisations to employ people who have high ethical standards.

To safeguard their organisations, many organisations incorporate background screening checks into their recruitment process. While the benefits of these are clear, there are legal ramifications which arise when a criminal record is revealed.  Refusing to employ an individual because they have a criminal record is against the law in Australia.

» Read more

Multi-score performance ratings work!

Multi-score performance ratings are employee performance feedback systems where feedback is obtained from multiple sources (supervisors, peers, clients. They are very popular, with almost all Fortune 500 companies in the US using this approach (Cheung, 1999).

Why are they so popular?

Research shows that there are a number of reasons that multi-score (also often known as 360 degree) performance rating systems work so well. Read on to find out more..

» Read more

A theory on managerial success: managers need “soft skills” too

Research has shown that while intelligence in its traditional form, including tasks assessing verbal, numerical, visuo-spatial, reasoning and working memory, is the best predictor of job performance, other skills are also important for managerial success.

Sternberg’s (1996; 1997) triarchic theory of intelligence proposes that intelligence is comprised of traditional analytic skills, practical skills and creativity. He advises that managers need all these components of intelligence in order to be successful. Practical skills are those used in the workplace to guide interactions, help solve problems and knowing how to act in certain situations. They are usually acquired without the direct help of other people. Creativity in the workplace is about seeing old problems and situations in new ways, or the catch phrase of the early 2000’s: thinking outside the box.

» Read more

Put your money where your mouth is when it comes to employee ethics

A recent study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has revealed that organisations may not be doing enough to promote and protect their values within the organisation. The study found that 40% of employees believe that their unethical colleagues not only go un-reprimanded, but are also frequently rewarded and promoted for their bad behaviour.  In addition, only 29% of respondents had a good understanding of their organisation’s values and 15% had no awareness of them.

It’s not all bad news, though, with almost three-quarters (73%) reporting that it is at least somewhat important to them that organisations to have well defined values which guide employee behaviour.

» Read more

Bribery and corruption – are organisations informed and prepared?

A recently released report outlining the findings of Deloitte’s 2012 Bribery and Corruption survey reveals that organisations in Australia and New Zealand may be ill-equipped to identify and manage corruption and bribery risk.

The survey was completed by 390 organisations from Australia and New Zealand, including publicly listed companies, Australian subsidiaries of foreign companies, public sector organisations and private companies.

Some key findings are:

 

 

» Read more

R your employees OK?

Thursday 13 September is National R U OK? Day.

R U OK? Day is a national mental health day on the second Thursday of September to encourage Australians to connect with their colleagues/employees by asking them: Are you okay?

One in five people experience depression at some point in their lives. That means that approximately 4 million Australians will suffer from depression. More than 2,000 Australians suicide each year. Depression is the most common mental illness, followed closely by anxiety.   Approximately 7 percent of Australian employees in any organisation suffer from depression each year.

 

So chances are that at least one person at each workplace may be suffering from a mental health problem right now.

» Read more

Keeping employees happy

Research has shown that some of the ‘perks’ that keep employees happy in their jobs are not the stereotypical ‘big ticket’ items that only larger businesses are able to offer.

Boredom, lack of opportunity and poor work-life balance are within the top four reasons that people leave their jobs, according to The Australian Human Resources Institute, rather than lack of perks such as corporate cards, cars and fancy technology. The Institute also found in a 2009 survey that employees value good communication and training opportunities over and above higher pay.

Other important considerations for employees, that are particularly relevant to smaller businesses that are unable to compete with large businesses on remuneration and work conditions, according to research undertaken by Deloitte, are:

» Read more

‘GPS building’ for your organisation

A GPS for business?

No, we’re not talking about a Global Positioning System for your car. But it is a similar principle. Many organisations and business leaders are arranging their organisation around GPS, or Guidance and Positioning Statements. Like a GPS in your car, an organisational GPS will guide your organisation to a chosen destination, providing clear directions and guidance along the way to shape the culture of the organisation. These statements can also be referred to as mission statements, values statements or charters.

An effective GPS is a key tool in fostering employee engagement.

A number of successful and high profile organisations understand this. BHP Billiton refers to their GPS (called a charter on their website) as the “single most important means by which we communicate who we are, what we do, and what we stand for as an organisation, and it is the basis for our decision-making”. Their Charter has existed for over 10 years with only minor modifications being made over that time.

» Read more

The hidden costs of employee disengagement

A recent research poll of Australian workers has found that more than 80% of Australian employees feel disengaged and work, with more than 20% being actively disengaged, that is behaving in ways that are actively harmful to the organisation.  They estimated that disengagement costs Australian organisations at least $33.5 Billion a year in lost productivity.  It also has other negative social effects outside the workplace, with disengaged employees taking out their negative feelings on their families and having more health problems.

As discussed in our earlier blog How engaged are your employees, employee engagement refers to the extent to which  employees believe in the values and mission of the organisation, are committed to their work and will act in ways that further the organisation’s interests.  It integrates the well known constructs of job satisfaction and organisational commitment.

Engaged employees are focused and connected at work, supportive of organisational goals and are willing to “go the extra mile” at work.

» Read more

Recruiting the Gen Y employee

http://www.smartcompany.com.au/Premium-Articles/Top-Story/Whod-hire-a-Gen-Y.html

What the research shows about Generation Y

Many surveys and studies on Generation Y (individuals born between approximately 1980 and 1995, earlier or later in some definitions) indicate that, as a group, there are a number of characteristics they tend to display that employers should be aware of when hiring and managing these individuals.

Specifically, research has shown that more than any other generation in the workforce, workers from Generation Y (Gen Yers) tend to:

– Anticipate changing jobs frequently (with some research showing more than half of Gen Yers anticipate changing jobs every 2 years).

– Be much more likely to move to a new job if their needs for challenge and career development are not met.

» Read more

Streamline your recruitment process to attract top talent!

A recent survey has shown that 79% of job applicants lose interest in a job when faced with a long recruitment process and 45% have withdrawn their application because they didn’t like the interviewer.

This is consistent with the experience of James Nicholson, managing director of the professional recruitment consultancy Robert Walters.  Nicholson said he has consistently observed that the organisations that are slow to make decisions or fail to properly sell the role have difficulty attracting  the best talent available. A streamlined recruitment process is critical.

» Read more

Fraud and misconduct prevention

Fraud and misconduct “grey areas” in the workplace

Yesterday’s Human Capital Australia magazine outlined a recent decision by Fair Work Australia (FWA) and the implications for dealing with fraud and misconduct in the workplace. 

A supermarket store manager was dismissed for taking groceries without paying, however the dismissal was overturned by FWA and he was awarded more than $15,000 in compensation as the matter was not properly investigated.  The manager claimed that he intended to pay for the groceries at a later stage and in the absence of an appropriate investigation  there was inadequate proof that this was not the case.

In his judgement Commissioner Ian Cambridge said that a “proper, comprehensive and balanced” consideration should have been provided before dismissing the employee.  A warning or dismissal with a notice period may have been a more suitable response.  The supermarket should have undertaken a thorough investigation to determine whether misconduct had occurred and to ensure their rights and the rights of the employee were protected.

This ruling has a number of important implications for employers.  The main implication relates to properly investigating alleged misconduct.  Another important implication is that employers should be careful about who they employ in the first place.

The old adage “prevention is better than cure” has never been more appropriate.  Dealing with misconduct once it has occurred can be fraught with difficulty, as this case highlights.  It is much easier to try to create a workplace where misconduct is unlikely to occur.

RightPeople has a range of psychometric tests designed to identify people who are most and least likely to engage in unethical and illegal behaviour within organisations.  These tests look at attitudes, behaviours and other risk factors associated with wrongdoing.  It’s called the Risk Management Profile (RMP).  Specifically, the RMP identifies integrity, honesty, poor impulse control, stress tolerance and conscientiousness.   Used in combination with our personality inventory it can be an invaluable tool for safeguarding your workplace against fraud and misconduct.

Contact us to find out more.

Psychometric personality tests

Our last blog looked at psychometric tests and the difference between psychometric and skills tests.

The main focus was on cognitive ability tests and specific skills sets.  An interesting question, therefore, is where does personality fit in?

Personality tests

Personality tests are psychometric tests.  They are based on personality research and theories about how personality is structured and how it can be assessed.  They have robust psychometric properties (high validity and reliability) and normative data gathered from many thousands of people.  They look at a different type of individual difference: individual propensities to think and act in certain ways.  Unlike cognitive ability tests and skills tests there is no right or wrong answer.  Different jobs and positions in jobs have different personality types that are best suited to them.  Although, there are certain personality traits where performance in a certain range is preferable for many jobs.

» Read more

Psychometric tests and skills tests – what’s the difference and what’s the value

Psychometric tests and skills tests are often used in job selection.  Both can be vital tools to help you find the best people for the job.  But what exactly are they, and what are the differences between these two types of tests?

Psychometric tests are instruments that tell us about individual differences: such as personal characteristics or cognitive ability (intelligence), compared to other people.  Skills tests tell us about whether a person can perform a certain set of tasks, and how well.  While they might sound quite similar, they are actually different.  The main differences between psychometric and skills tests are their design, their applicability and what conclusions can be drawn.

» Read more

More on skills tests v’s psychometric tests – declarative and procedural knowledge

Declarative and procedural knowledge

There are several different ‘ways’ of knowing things and of acquiring knowledge.  Two of the main ways are declarative and procedural knowledge.  Declarative knowledge is knowing that – i.e.,  factual knowledge and information – for instance that Sir Edmund Hilary climbed Mt Everest.  Procedural knowledge is knowing how – i.e., knowing how to perform activities – like playing tennis.

» Read more

1 2